Scott Morrison flags industrial relations bill revival

Date

The Morrison government would reintroduce parts of its scrapped industrial relations bill to parliament if re-elected. 

The government last year dumped its omnibus bill after failing to secure votes on parts of the legislation.

Provisions to criminalise wage theft and changes to enterprise bargaining were scrapped, as were award simplification and the ability to lock work sites into eight-year pay agreements for major projects.

But Prime Minister Scott Morrison has flagged the bill will be reintroduced to parliament if the coalition wins the federal election on May 21. 

“Ensuring that we can go forward and pursue those legislative changes that we wanted to pursue,” he told reporters in Melbourne on Saturday. 

“Remember, they were the product of getting unions together, employers together, over countless numbers of hours to ensure that we can come up with practical things that would make the industrial relations system work better. And the Labor Party rejected it.”

It came after Labor promised to legislate a federal anti-corruption commission by the end of the year if they win government.

The proposed commission would have the ability to hold public hearings of politicians, as well as retroactive powers.

Labor leader Anthony Albanese said his proposed commission would be kept at arm’s length under his government and wouldn’t be politicised.

“The reason Scott Morrison doesn’t have a national anti-corruption commission is sitting on his front bench,” Mr Albanese said on Saturday.

Mr Albanese and Mr Morrison will pause their campaigning on Sunday to observe Easter celebrations.

AAP

More
articles